Māori outcomes

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Our focus for the next three years is to deliver on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and measure the impacts of this framework against our Māori outcomes.

We will do this through:

  • Effective Māori participation: help mana whenua iwi (Māori who have historic and territorial rights over the land) and Māori communities become active partners and participants at all levels of our decision-making.
  • Realising rangatahi (young people's) potential: we involve rangatahi in council activities and projects to support their leadership, training and employment.
  • Kaitiakitanga (guardianship): we actively encourage Māori participation to manage taonga (valuable) resources. We work with mana whenua and Māori to manage, restore and protect our water resources and to co-design and deliver environmental management and community-led conservation initiatives.
  • Whānau (family) and tamariki (children) wellbeing support: we support well-being through place-based services in council-owned venues (like libraries) as well as through Ngā Hapori Momoho -Thriving Communities strategy.
  • Marae development: the Marae Infrastructure Programme aims to ensure that marae are healthy and sustainable cultural hubs.
  • Māori identity and culture: we promote Māori identity and culture through events such as Matariki and Waitangi, and deliver them in partnership with mana whenua. We also promote Māori culture and identity by protecting sites of significance, Māori public art and applying Te Aranga design principles in our spaces and places.
  • Māori business, tourism and development: we actively provide economic opportunities for Māori and support Māori growth in business and tourism. This includes promoting Māori entrepreneurship (businesses) through better use of procurement (buying things for a company or organisation) and supply chains (networks that move products from suppliers to customers).
  • Te Reo Māori: we deliver bilingual signage (in te reo and English) at:
    • key council and council-controlled organisation (CCO) sites
    • within parks and on other council assets
    • through announcements in Te Reo on public transport
    • in council venues and on media platforms (TV, radio, online).
  • An empowered organisation: we achieve outcomes and benefits for Māori by honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and by developing the capability of elected members and staff to work effectively with Māori. We also support career development and progression of Māori and specialist staff within Auckland Council and CCOs.
  • Papakāinga (housing on ancestral Māori land) and Māori housing: we provide technical resources and support to Māori and mana whenua with resource and building consents. We work with the Regulatory Services Directorate and Māori Housing Unit to develop individual and communal housing.

Decorative image of two children outside a marae.

You should know

The information on this page is an edited version of the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034. For more information, see pages 88 of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document [PDF 17MB].

Our focus for the next three years is to deliver on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau and measure the impacts of this framework against our Māori outcomes.

We will do this through:

  • Effective Māori participation: help mana whenua iwi (Māori who have historic and territorial rights over the land) and Māori communities become active partners and participants at all levels of our decision-making.
  • Realising rangatahi (young people's) potential: we involve rangatahi in council activities and projects to support their leadership, training and employment.
  • Kaitiakitanga (guardianship): we actively encourage Māori participation to manage taonga (valuable) resources. We work with mana whenua and Māori to manage, restore and protect our water resources and to co-design and deliver environmental management and community-led conservation initiatives.
  • Whānau (family) and tamariki (children) wellbeing support: we support well-being through place-based services in council-owned venues (like libraries) as well as through Ngā Hapori Momoho -Thriving Communities strategy.
  • Marae development: the Marae Infrastructure Programme aims to ensure that marae are healthy and sustainable cultural hubs.
  • Māori identity and culture: we promote Māori identity and culture through events such as Matariki and Waitangi, and deliver them in partnership with mana whenua. We also promote Māori culture and identity by protecting sites of significance, Māori public art and applying Te Aranga design principles in our spaces and places.
  • Māori business, tourism and development: we actively provide economic opportunities for Māori and support Māori growth in business and tourism. This includes promoting Māori entrepreneurship (businesses) through better use of procurement (buying things for a company or organisation) and supply chains (networks that move products from suppliers to customers).
  • Te Reo Māori: we deliver bilingual signage (in te reo and English) at:
    • key council and council-controlled organisation (CCO) sites
    • within parks and on other council assets
    • through announcements in Te Reo on public transport
    • in council venues and on media platforms (TV, radio, online).
  • An empowered organisation: we achieve outcomes and benefits for Māori by honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and by developing the capability of elected members and staff to work effectively with Māori. We also support career development and progression of Māori and specialist staff within Auckland Council and CCOs.
  • Papakāinga (housing on ancestral Māori land) and Māori housing: we provide technical resources and support to Māori and mana whenua with resource and building consents. We work with the Regulatory Services Directorate and Māori Housing Unit to develop individual and communal housing.

Decorative image of two children outside a marae.

You should know

The information on this page is an edited version of the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034. For more information, see pages 88 of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document [PDF 17MB].

Page last updated: 02 Apr 2024, 06:41 AM