Key issue 1: Climate

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Graphic image of Auckland Central Business District with Sky tower and other buildings. The image shows cyclists, cars, bus, train, ferry and a slice of park land with trees.

The issue

Last year was New Zealand’s hottest since records began a century ago, and seven of the last nine years have been among the hottest on record too. We must act, and act now, to protect our planet for future generations.

Climate emergency

In June 2019, Auckland Council unanimously declared a climate emergency, recognising our region’s role in limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Around 43.4 per cent of Auckland’s total emissions come from transport which has increased by 86 per cent between 1990 and 2018.

Even if we are able to reduce transport emissions, we still have to plan for increasing temperatures and extreme weather event such as floods, droughts and cyclones etc.

We have made a start, but need to do more

Two core goals were established for our region through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri (Auckland’s Climate Plan):

  • Halving regional emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050.
  • Taking a precautionary approach to planning for the impacts of climate change.

A $152 million climate package was included in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 with a range of initiatives for mitigation and adaptation in action.

We have made a start but what we are doing falls well short of reducing Auckland's emissions to the levels we have to achieve.

Climate action package

Graphic showing that the Climate Action Package is a combination of public transport, active network, and urban ngahere (forest) investment.

The package includes investments in:

  • public transport
  • active network
  • urban ngahere (forest).

The package:

  • will be high impact
  • will address inequity
  • can be started fast
  • has wide regional benefits.

What we are proposing

To accelerate our response to the climate emergency, we are proposing the funding of $574 million from a targeted rate over the next 10 years.

We will seek to use this funding to unlock government co-funding ($344 million) and with the expected fare revenue ($127 million), will see a $1.045 billion investment in buses, ferries, walking, cycling and our urban forest canopy.

This climate action package puts an immediate focus on enhancing low carbon transport options and greening our neighbourhoods as well as generating wide regional benefits and addressing existing inequity in the provision of services.

What we get with the package

The funding will be used to invest in three areas.

Public transport

Graphic of a ferry and a Auckland Transport bus.

Providing much greater access to efficient and reliable low-carbon public transport.

  • Improve frequency and coverage of bus services in all Auckland wards, including ten new frequent bus routes serving south Auckland, west Auckland, Ōrakei, Tāmaki and New Lynn to Onehunga via Mount Roskill, and an extension of frequent services on the Northern Express to Hibiscus Coast station. The vast majority of bus routes will be upgraded to ensure they operate at least every 30 minutes from early in the morning until late in the evening, 7 days per week.
  • Addition of 79 low-emission buses and six to seven low-emissions ferries.
  • Wharf upgrades and charging infrastructure to allow for electric ferries.

Active network

Graphic of lady jogging with her pet dog and people standing.

Providing safe, convenient and well-connected walking and cycling options for many more Aucklanders.

  • Completion of key links in the separated cycling network, including connections to schools and jobs in the North Shore, Manurewa, Onehunga, Hobsonville and New Lynn.
  • Up to 35km of walking improvements, including improvements to footpaths, more pedestrian crossings, improved accessibility and better pedestrian lighting in key locations across Auckland, and a targeted investment to improve the safety and ease of walking in Manurewa.

Urban ngahere (forest)

Graphic of a house near some tall trees.

Planting trees now to prepare for a warmer future, reducing vulnerability to extreme heat.

  • Around 14,800 native trees planted in areas of heat vulnerability or lowest canopy cover.
  • More than 4000 trees and plants for tiny forests, food forests, māra kai (food gardens) and bush remnants.
  • Grants for rongoā (medicinal herb) planting.

What reduced carbon emissions will result in

Graphic of a bus, cyclist, a lady walking, car, houses and parkland with trees.

  • One million people living within 500m of bus routes receiving improvements.
  • Safer streets to walk and cycle on.
  • Greener neighbourhoods with more natural shade protection from increasing temperatures.

Find more information

For more information on the proposed climate package, see page 6 of the supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

How we will fund the proposal

Climate Action Targeted Rate

A targeted rate based on property value is proposed to fund these activities.

The funding would be ring-fenced so that there is full transparency around how and why we are spending this money.

This rate is proposed to be adjusted in line with the average general rates increases each year.

Estimated targeted rate amounts in the main categories of ratepayers are as below:

Median urban residential property

Graphic of a town house and a tree.

  • Capital value: $1.2 million.
  • Weekly cost: $1.12.
  • Annual rate: $58.30.

Median business property

Graphic of a tall building.

  • Capital value: $1.15 million.
  • Weekly cost: $1.86.
  • Annual rate: $96.80.

Median rural residential property

Graphic of a rural house near a tree with a sheep standing close by.

  • Capital value: $1.05 million.
  • Weekly cost: $0.88.
  • Annual rate: $45.90.

Median farm/ lifestyle property

Graphic of a cow.

  • Capital value: $1.73 million.
  • Weekly cost: $1.29.
  • Annual rate: $67.10.

The median property value has been used to best reflect what most ratepayers will pay. At this value 50 per cent will pay more and 50 per cent will pay less. For the rate based on average property values, see How the Annual Budget 2022/2023 will affect your rates.

Find more information

For more information on the addition of the targeted rate improvements, see page 16 of the supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

Online budgeting tool

How would you prioritise operating spending to help manage ongoing budget pressures?

We invite you to use our online budgeting tool to look at the impact some changes on cost and service levels can have on the budget.

You should know

This information on climate policy is an edited version of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 pages.

See pages 12-15 of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 document (PDF 10MB) for more information.

Graphic image of Auckland Central Business District with Sky tower and other buildings. The image shows cyclists, cars, bus, train, ferry and a slice of park land with trees.

The issue

Last year was New Zealand’s hottest since records began a century ago, and seven of the last nine years have been among the hottest on record too. We must act, and act now, to protect our planet for future generations.

Climate emergency

In June 2019, Auckland Council unanimously declared a climate emergency, recognising our region’s role in limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Around 43.4 per cent of Auckland’s total emissions come from transport which has increased by 86 per cent between 1990 and 2018.

Even if we are able to reduce transport emissions, we still have to plan for increasing temperatures and extreme weather event such as floods, droughts and cyclones etc.

We have made a start, but need to do more

Two core goals were established for our region through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri (Auckland’s Climate Plan):

  • Halving regional emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050.
  • Taking a precautionary approach to planning for the impacts of climate change.

A $152 million climate package was included in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 with a range of initiatives for mitigation and adaptation in action.

We have made a start but what we are doing falls well short of reducing Auckland's emissions to the levels we have to achieve.

Climate action package

Graphic showing that the Climate Action Package is a combination of public transport, active network, and urban ngahere (forest) investment.

The package includes investments in:

  • public transport
  • active network
  • urban ngahere (forest).

The package:

  • will be high impact
  • will address inequity
  • can be started fast
  • has wide regional benefits.

What we are proposing

To accelerate our response to the climate emergency, we are proposing the funding of $574 million from a targeted rate over the next 10 years.

We will seek to use this funding to unlock government co-funding ($344 million) and with the expected fare revenue ($127 million), will see a $1.045 billion investment in buses, ferries, walking, cycling and our urban forest canopy.

This climate action package puts an immediate focus on enhancing low carbon transport options and greening our neighbourhoods as well as generating wide regional benefits and addressing existing inequity in the provision of services.

What we get with the package

The funding will be used to invest in three areas.

Public transport

Graphic of a ferry and a Auckland Transport bus.

Providing much greater access to efficient and reliable low-carbon public transport.

  • Improve frequency and coverage of bus services in all Auckland wards, including ten new frequent bus routes serving south Auckland, west Auckland, Ōrakei, Tāmaki and New Lynn to Onehunga via Mount Roskill, and an extension of frequent services on the Northern Express to Hibiscus Coast station. The vast majority of bus routes will be upgraded to ensure they operate at least every 30 minutes from early in the morning until late in the evening, 7 days per week.
  • Addition of 79 low-emission buses and six to seven low-emissions ferries.
  • Wharf upgrades and charging infrastructure to allow for electric ferries.

Active network

Graphic of lady jogging with her pet dog and people standing.

Providing safe, convenient and well-connected walking and cycling options for many more Aucklanders.

  • Completion of key links in the separated cycling network, including connections to schools and jobs in the North Shore, Manurewa, Onehunga, Hobsonville and New Lynn.
  • Up to 35km of walking improvements, including improvements to footpaths, more pedestrian crossings, improved accessibility and better pedestrian lighting in key locations across Auckland, and a targeted investment to improve the safety and ease of walking in Manurewa.

Urban ngahere (forest)

Graphic of a house near some tall trees.

Planting trees now to prepare for a warmer future, reducing vulnerability to extreme heat.

  • Around 14,800 native trees planted in areas of heat vulnerability or lowest canopy cover.
  • More than 4000 trees and plants for tiny forests, food forests, māra kai (food gardens) and bush remnants.
  • Grants for rongoā (medicinal herb) planting.

What reduced carbon emissions will result in

Graphic of a bus, cyclist, a lady walking, car, houses and parkland with trees.

  • One million people living within 500m of bus routes receiving improvements.
  • Safer streets to walk and cycle on.
  • Greener neighbourhoods with more natural shade protection from increasing temperatures.

Find more information

For more information on the proposed climate package, see page 6 of the supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

How we will fund the proposal

Climate Action Targeted Rate

A targeted rate based on property value is proposed to fund these activities.

The funding would be ring-fenced so that there is full transparency around how and why we are spending this money.

This rate is proposed to be adjusted in line with the average general rates increases each year.

Estimated targeted rate amounts in the main categories of ratepayers are as below:

Median urban residential property

Graphic of a town house and a tree.

  • Capital value: $1.2 million.
  • Weekly cost: $1.12.
  • Annual rate: $58.30.

Median business property

Graphic of a tall building.

  • Capital value: $1.15 million.
  • Weekly cost: $1.86.
  • Annual rate: $96.80.

Median rural residential property

Graphic of a rural house near a tree with a sheep standing close by.

  • Capital value: $1.05 million.
  • Weekly cost: $0.88.
  • Annual rate: $45.90.

Median farm/ lifestyle property

Graphic of a cow.

  • Capital value: $1.73 million.
  • Weekly cost: $1.29.
  • Annual rate: $67.10.

The median property value has been used to best reflect what most ratepayers will pay. At this value 50 per cent will pay more and 50 per cent will pay less. For the rate based on average property values, see How the Annual Budget 2022/2023 will affect your rates.

Find more information

For more information on the addition of the targeted rate improvements, see page 16 of the supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

Online budgeting tool

How would you prioritise operating spending to help manage ongoing budget pressures?

We invite you to use our online budgeting tool to look at the impact some changes on cost and service levels can have on the budget.

You should know

This information on climate policy is an edited version of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 pages.

See pages 12-15 of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 document (PDF 10MB) for more information.

Page last updated: 28 Mar 2022, 06:38 PM