City and local development

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Our central proposal for city and local development

We help deliver a vibrant city centre and local town centres.

We do this to:

  • support businesses and advance a thriving economy
  • promote strong and inclusive communities
  • showcase the culture and identity of Auckland.

As the city grows, the council needs to build and develop supporting infrastructure (like water systems, gas and electrical utilities, roads and carparks) and respond to direction from central government.

The council will:

  • focus and align major investment in designing and arranging spaces to meet the needs of Aucklanders (known as space-shaping programmes)
  • continue to identify and unlock development opportunities (part of our urban regeneration programme) to support building new homes, create walkable, well-connected, low-carbon communities and attract investment. (Visit Eke Panuku for more information.)

We will do our best to enable and support development around major transport investment to:

  • maximise value for money
  • reduce emissions
  • support better use of existing assets.

This includes:

  • supporting residential and employment growth in the city centre
  • major new transport infrastructure
  • the completion of the City Rail Link.

Infill development (constructing new buildings on vacant or underused land) is also changing Auckland.

Urban regeneration (planning neighbourhoods and improving buildings) plays an important part in ensuring development areas are well-planned and that they strengthen communities and the economy.

Decorative image of construction workers on a building site.

Highlights of our central proposal for city and local development

Under our central proposal we will:

  • restore Eke Panuku’s $100 million Strategic Development Fund to deliver faster and better regeneration outcomes
  • continue to regenerate (renew and improve) our neighbourhoods in Takapuna, Northcote, Henderson, Avondale, Maungawhau, Panmure, Onehunga, Papatoetoe, Manukau, Pukekohe, Ormiston, the city centre, the waterfront and the port precinct
  • begin the phased transformation of Wynyard Point open space - Te Ara Tukutuku
  • open up two to three new development locations as current regeneration programmes are completed to increase the vibrancy, safety and success of these centres
  • renew critical assets (essential infrastructure), particularly on our waterfronts
  • continue to deliver the city centre targeted rate programme
  • complete the Midtown Regeneration Programme and the Karanga-a-Hape Station neighbourhood improvement programme to improve the urban environment and support growth around the CRL station
  • complete master planning of the port land including options for the future use of Queens Wharf.

Trade-offs

We have developed other options to show you what to expect for city and local development should we pay less or pay more for them (through our rates).

Pay more, get more

Paying more (in rates) will result in higher investment in urban regeneration activities by funding more (four to six) new programmes and regenerating 16-18 locations over this long-term plan.

This would achieve a lot more than the central proposal, which includes two to three Transform and Unlock programmes (urban regeneration programmes).

We could also increase the Strategic Development Fund facility to support new urban regeneration locations.

Pay less, get less

A pay less, get less scenario would mean less investment in urban regeneration activities. It would stop or defer one or more of the approved Transform and Unlock programmes (urban regeneration programmes).

Importantly, it would mean property disposal (selling assets) to achieve both revenue (income) and strategic outcomes, depending on market demand under the ‘get less’ options.

Planned investment in public realm projects (public spaces) would stop - except for projects that are already under way. The placemaking programme would also come to an end.

Decorative image of a woman weighing a lot of books in one hand and fewer books in her other hand.

You should know

The information on this page is an edited version of the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document.

For more information about our proposals for city and local development, see page 42-43 of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document [PDF 17MB].

Our central proposal for city and local development

We help deliver a vibrant city centre and local town centres.

We do this to:

  • support businesses and advance a thriving economy
  • promote strong and inclusive communities
  • showcase the culture and identity of Auckland.

As the city grows, the council needs to build and develop supporting infrastructure (like water systems, gas and electrical utilities, roads and carparks) and respond to direction from central government.

The council will:

  • focus and align major investment in designing and arranging spaces to meet the needs of Aucklanders (known as space-shaping programmes)
  • continue to identify and unlock development opportunities (part of our urban regeneration programme) to support building new homes, create walkable, well-connected, low-carbon communities and attract investment. (Visit Eke Panuku for more information.)

We will do our best to enable and support development around major transport investment to:

  • maximise value for money
  • reduce emissions
  • support better use of existing assets.

This includes:

  • supporting residential and employment growth in the city centre
  • major new transport infrastructure
  • the completion of the City Rail Link.

Infill development (constructing new buildings on vacant or underused land) is also changing Auckland.

Urban regeneration (planning neighbourhoods and improving buildings) plays an important part in ensuring development areas are well-planned and that they strengthen communities and the economy.

Decorative image of construction workers on a building site.

Highlights of our central proposal for city and local development

Under our central proposal we will:

  • restore Eke Panuku’s $100 million Strategic Development Fund to deliver faster and better regeneration outcomes
  • continue to regenerate (renew and improve) our neighbourhoods in Takapuna, Northcote, Henderson, Avondale, Maungawhau, Panmure, Onehunga, Papatoetoe, Manukau, Pukekohe, Ormiston, the city centre, the waterfront and the port precinct
  • begin the phased transformation of Wynyard Point open space - Te Ara Tukutuku
  • open up two to three new development locations as current regeneration programmes are completed to increase the vibrancy, safety and success of these centres
  • renew critical assets (essential infrastructure), particularly on our waterfronts
  • continue to deliver the city centre targeted rate programme
  • complete the Midtown Regeneration Programme and the Karanga-a-Hape Station neighbourhood improvement programme to improve the urban environment and support growth around the CRL station
  • complete master planning of the port land including options for the future use of Queens Wharf.

Trade-offs

We have developed other options to show you what to expect for city and local development should we pay less or pay more for them (through our rates).

Pay more, get more

Paying more (in rates) will result in higher investment in urban regeneration activities by funding more (four to six) new programmes and regenerating 16-18 locations over this long-term plan.

This would achieve a lot more than the central proposal, which includes two to three Transform and Unlock programmes (urban regeneration programmes).

We could also increase the Strategic Development Fund facility to support new urban regeneration locations.

Pay less, get less

A pay less, get less scenario would mean less investment in urban regeneration activities. It would stop or defer one or more of the approved Transform and Unlock programmes (urban regeneration programmes).

Importantly, it would mean property disposal (selling assets) to achieve both revenue (income) and strategic outcomes, depending on market demand under the ‘get less’ options.

Planned investment in public realm projects (public spaces) would stop - except for projects that are already under way. The placemaking programme would also come to an end.

Decorative image of a woman weighing a lot of books in one hand and fewer books in her other hand.

You should know

The information on this page is an edited version of the proposed Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document.

For more information about our proposals for city and local development, see page 42-43 of the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 Consultation Document [PDF 17MB].

Page last updated: 02 Apr 2024, 07:47 AM