Waiake Beach Reserve

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Consultation with the public was undertaken during the period 09 to 27 November 2020. The results of the consultation were shared with the local board on 11 December 2020.

What happened with your feedback

  • At a business meeting on 18 February 2021 the local board approved the option to remove the tree limb and restore full access to the boardwalk at Waiake Beach in Torbay (resolution HB/2021/5)
  • The tree limb removal is scheduled for the 8 June, subject to weather conditions

Auckland Council applied for resource consent in January 2021 and the consent was granted on 20 May 2021. As per the consent conditions, the pruning will be limited to the part of the limb past the large vertical aerial root as indicated on the image below

What we asked

A low-hanging pōhutukawa branch is currently blocking a popular boardwalk at Waiake Beach and has initiated a review of the boardwalk and adjacent shed.

Access to the boardwalk is currently restricted to those able to pass the tree limb by bending down. Signs have been put up to address the issue but we would like to hear from you on the matter.

This is not the only issue that affects the stretch of coastline at Waiake Beach.

Other considerations include:

  • erosion on the creek bands
  • structural issues with the walkway and shed
  • the fact that other limbs of the tree will continue to drop down and continue to cause access issues for both the boardwalk and shed in future

What you said

  • A total of 163 responses were received. 140 of these were submitted from the residents of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, with the remaining 23 responses received from residents of other local board areas.
  • A range of views were received along with a large number of comments. There was strong support for protection of the overall tree and the natural environment at Waiake Beach Reserve.
  • Of the respondents, 66.3 per cent say the low hanging tree affects their use of the boardwalk. The comments indicate the effects are not only a perceived safety hazard but also inconvenience when using the boardwalk.
  • The majority of respondents (79.3 per cent) use the boardwalk “always” or “usually” when visiting the reserve. This means that despite the tree limb causing a hindrance, the boardwalk is still heavily used.
  • The consultation confirmed 24.5 per cent of respondents use the pedestrian crossing regularly (“always” or “usually”). This could indicate that the use of the pedestrian crossing could be promoted further as alternative to the boardwalk. However, this may require some improvements to the crossing to assist with vehicular traffic. At present 73.6 per cent of the respondents prefer to use the boardwalk for safety reasons.
  • The responses relating to the trimming of the tree limb were mixed. The responses could be interpreted in favour of trimming the tree to improve safety and convenience, as well as in favour of not trimming the limb and focusing on the maintaining the natural environment and the health of the tree.

Consultation with the public was undertaken during the period 09 to 27 November 2020. The results of the consultation were shared with the local board on 11 December 2020.

What happened with your feedback

  • At a business meeting on 18 February 2021 the local board approved the option to remove the tree limb and restore full access to the boardwalk at Waiake Beach in Torbay (resolution HB/2021/5)
  • The tree limb removal is scheduled for the 8 June, subject to weather conditions

Auckland Council applied for resource consent in January 2021 and the consent was granted on 20 May 2021. As per the consent conditions, the pruning will be limited to the part of the limb past the large vertical aerial root as indicated on the image below

What we asked

A low-hanging pōhutukawa branch is currently blocking a popular boardwalk at Waiake Beach and has initiated a review of the boardwalk and adjacent shed.

Access to the boardwalk is currently restricted to those able to pass the tree limb by bending down. Signs have been put up to address the issue but we would like to hear from you on the matter.

This is not the only issue that affects the stretch of coastline at Waiake Beach.

Other considerations include:

  • erosion on the creek bands
  • structural issues with the walkway and shed
  • the fact that other limbs of the tree will continue to drop down and continue to cause access issues for both the boardwalk and shed in future

What you said

  • A total of 163 responses were received. 140 of these were submitted from the residents of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, with the remaining 23 responses received from residents of other local board areas.
  • A range of views were received along with a large number of comments. There was strong support for protection of the overall tree and the natural environment at Waiake Beach Reserve.
  • Of the respondents, 66.3 per cent say the low hanging tree affects their use of the boardwalk. The comments indicate the effects are not only a perceived safety hazard but also inconvenience when using the boardwalk.
  • The majority of respondents (79.3 per cent) use the boardwalk “always” or “usually” when visiting the reserve. This means that despite the tree limb causing a hindrance, the boardwalk is still heavily used.
  • The consultation confirmed 24.5 per cent of respondents use the pedestrian crossing regularly (“always” or “usually”). This could indicate that the use of the pedestrian crossing could be promoted further as alternative to the boardwalk. However, this may require some improvements to the crossing to assist with vehicular traffic. At present 73.6 per cent of the respondents prefer to use the boardwalk for safety reasons.
  • The responses relating to the trimming of the tree limb were mixed. The responses could be interpreted in favour of trimming the tree to improve safety and convenience, as well as in favour of not trimming the limb and focusing on the maintaining the natural environment and the health of the tree.