Ture ā Rohe Urungi Āhuru / Navigation Safety Bylaw

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Children pulling a water craft to the shore line

Consultation for this project has now closed.

About this project

Every day people use Auckland’s navigable waters for both recreation and business, for example boating, kayaking, kite boarding, swimming, fishing, and ferrying people and cargo.

The number of people and variety of uses of Auckland’s navigable waters can increase the risk of accidents, nuisance and damage. For example, jet skis used in swimming areas, illegally moored vessels and explosive cargo.

Council makes rules to minimise the risk of accidents, nuisance and damage within Auckland’s navigable waters

What happens next

  • We will provide a feedback summary in March 2021
  • Local boards will formally discuss the feedback on Friday 7 May at 9:30am
  • Local boards will have the opportunity to speak to their resolution directly to the Bylaw Panel in May 2021
  • The Bylaw Panel will deliberate on public and local board feedback and finalise recommendations to Governing Body on Friday, 14 May at 9.30am and Tuesday, 18 May at 10.30am
  • The Governing Body will adopt the propsoed changes to the bylaw in June 2021

These will be held in the reception lounge, level 2, Auckland Town Hall, 301 Queen St, Auckland Central.

Consultation for this project has now closed.

About this project

Every day people use Auckland’s navigable waters for both recreation and business, for example boating, kayaking, kite boarding, swimming, fishing, and ferrying people and cargo.

The number of people and variety of uses of Auckland’s navigable waters can increase the risk of accidents, nuisance and damage. For example, jet skis used in swimming areas, illegally moored vessels and explosive cargo.

Council makes rules to minimise the risk of accidents, nuisance and damage within Auckland’s navigable waters

What happens next

  • We will provide a feedback summary in March 2021
  • Local boards will formally discuss the feedback on Friday 7 May at 9:30am
  • Local boards will have the opportunity to speak to their resolution directly to the Bylaw Panel in May 2021
  • The Bylaw Panel will deliberate on public and local board feedback and finalise recommendations to Governing Body on Friday, 14 May at 9.30am and Tuesday, 18 May at 10.30am
  • The Governing Body will adopt the propsoed changes to the bylaw in June 2021

These will be held in the reception lounge, level 2, Auckland Town Hall, 301 Queen St, Auckland Central.

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    Good afternoon, Could you clarify the statement "..carrying at least two independent FORMS of communication on a vessel" please, with regard to the following scenario: A small dinghy with two people on board, fishing 1000m from shore. As this is out of earshot "voice" is not applicable, as per the example of a kayaker closer to shore. If each person onboard has a cellphone, would that be considered two independent forms of communication? Or, as they are both of the same communication type (a cellphone), are they considered of the same FORM and therefore, the bylaw would also require second form, ie. VHF radio, to be installed in the dinghy? Thanks very much. Jared

    Jared Smith asked 4 months ago

    Kia ora Jared,

     Thank you for taking time to provide feedback.

     With regards to the first scenario, if the dinghy was intending to go further than 100 meters or a distance not considered close to shore, then the person in charge of the dinghy must ensure that they have the appropriate means to be able to communicate with a land-based person(s). For example, two independent forms of communication may include a cell phone or VHF radio. In the scenario where a dinghy is relatively close to shore as with the kayak example, then the use of their voice would suffice as another form of communication.

     With regards to the second scenario with the carrying of two cell phones on board, if there was an issue with phone coverage from the water then it is assumed that both cell phones would not be useful in a case of an emergency. The main rationale behind having two different forms is that should one form not work, then there is at least another means of communication as a viable back up.

    Ngā mihi
    The Project Team