Māngere West - Your Streets, Your Future

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Your Streets, Your Future


Bader Drive and Elmdon Street, Māngere


As the Māngere community grows and more housing is being built, Auckland Transport and Kāinga Ora want to ensure local roading and infrastructure can support the increase in population, and can work better for the needs of the whānau here.


What’s happening on Bader Drive


The Māngere College community and neighbours told us that the pedestrian crossing feels unsafe, especially during busy pick up and drop off times outside school. They also told us they were proud that Māngere is a gateway to New Zealand, and their cultural identity wasn’t reflected in their streets.

Through this project we are testing how the pedestrian crossing outside Māngere College can be made safer and act as a visible gateway to Māngere College by;

  • Installing planters to stop illegal parking close to the crossing which, at pick up and drop off times, makes it hard for people to see students trying to cross the road

  • Narrowing down the traffic lanes leading up to the crossing, slowing down cars and making the pedestrian crossing distance shorter

  • Installing road artwork designed by Māngere College students which reflect narratives of the Tararata Stream.

There will still be places to park to pick up students - it will just be at a safer distance from the crossing.



Proposed temporary changes on Bader Drive


These interventions at the crossing are trial measures to improve safety while Kāinga Ora, AT, and Māngere College investigate permanently upgrading the entrance to the school.

The feedback we receive will help us to design this more permanent solution.


These changes are planned to be installed over 3 night shifts during the week of the 7th - 11th June.


How to give us feedback

The project team will be popping up on Bader Drive outside Māngere College on Tuesday 22nd June 3.15pm - 4.30pm with some kai and music, and to have conversations with the community about the project and to gather your feedback.

Fill in our community feedback survey here

Or if you have any questions or feedback please email atengagement@at.govt.nz


What’s happening on Elmdon Street

With construction of new homes along the street and drivers navigating the frequent changes in roadspace, we’re taking the opportunity to close the road for a day to test traffic-calming road art, as well as getting residents and neighbours out into the space for a fun afternoon event. These tests and your feedback will help inform Kāinga Ora’s plans for the future of the street.

This event will be happening on Sunday 27th June from 1pm - 4pm.

More information on this event will be published soon.





How did we get here?




The proposed trials are the outcome of community design events, where we asked locals how they would improve their streets for people to walk, ride, and drive safely. Our aim is to build a greater sense of community in designing safer streets. That means ensuring both our team, and project outcomes, reflect the voice of Māngere.

Examples of our commitment to this is the engagement of Māngere College students in a co-design programme, and employment of locals to lead our design development, communications and implementation. Most importantly, it means weaving community design workshops into our engagement process.

The co-design group is made up of students from Māngere College and Manurewa High School who are interested in urban planning, arts, architecture and design, run by MAU Academy. The events on Bader Drive and Elmdon Street engage with local families, to share their experiences of getting around Māngere. We also created an online survey to reach more residents of Māngere in our consultation process.

Ultimately, residents, schools, and community organisations are leading the redevelopment of their streets so it reflects their needs, worldviews, and future.

This project is funded by Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Development and Auckland Transport, through Waka Kotahi’s Innovating Streets for People fund.



What we heard


    • Most people prefer to drive to work or school, which means lots of cars down Bader Drive at peak hours. The crossing outside Māngere College can feel unsafe with cars competing for road space and speeding outside of rush hour.
    • Cars park on Bader Drive close to the pedestrian crossing meaning it’s hard to see people waiting to cross or for people to see cars coming.
    • High traffic speeds on Elmdon Street make crossing the road and walking to school feel unsafe.
    • People enjoy walking around their neighbourhoods in Māngere and would like to see areas like Tararata Creek pathways made lighter and more vibrant, as well as more spaces that reflect the pride and love they have for Māngere.
    • Residents would like to see more room made on the street for people in the new apartments (corner Bader and Mackenzie), and whānau accessing Māngere College.




What do you think?

We will be launching a new community survey once the installation is complete outside of Māngere College to get your feedback. In the meantime if you have any questions or feedback please email atengagement@at.govt.nz





Your Streets, Your Future


Bader Drive and Elmdon Street, Māngere


As the Māngere community grows and more housing is being built, Auckland Transport and Kāinga Ora want to ensure local roading and infrastructure can support the increase in population, and can work better for the needs of the whānau here.


What’s happening on Bader Drive


The Māngere College community and neighbours told us that the pedestrian crossing feels unsafe, especially during busy pick up and drop off times outside school. They also told us they were proud that Māngere is a gateway to New Zealand, and their cultural identity wasn’t reflected in their streets.

Through this project we are testing how the pedestrian crossing outside Māngere College can be made safer and act as a visible gateway to Māngere College by;

  • Installing planters to stop illegal parking close to the crossing which, at pick up and drop off times, makes it hard for people to see students trying to cross the road

  • Narrowing down the traffic lanes leading up to the crossing, slowing down cars and making the pedestrian crossing distance shorter

  • Installing road artwork designed by Māngere College students which reflect narratives of the Tararata Stream.

There will still be places to park to pick up students - it will just be at a safer distance from the crossing.



Proposed temporary changes on Bader Drive


These interventions at the crossing are trial measures to improve safety while Kāinga Ora, AT, and Māngere College investigate permanently upgrading the entrance to the school.

The feedback we receive will help us to design this more permanent solution.


These changes are planned to be installed over 3 night shifts during the week of the 7th - 11th June.


How to give us feedback

The project team will be popping up on Bader Drive outside Māngere College on Tuesday 22nd June 3.15pm - 4.30pm with some kai and music, and to have conversations with the community about the project and to gather your feedback.

Fill in our community feedback survey here

Or if you have any questions or feedback please email atengagement@at.govt.nz


What’s happening on Elmdon Street

With construction of new homes along the street and drivers navigating the frequent changes in roadspace, we’re taking the opportunity to close the road for a day to test traffic-calming road art, as well as getting residents and neighbours out into the space for a fun afternoon event. These tests and your feedback will help inform Kāinga Ora’s plans for the future of the street.

This event will be happening on Sunday 27th June from 1pm - 4pm.

More information on this event will be published soon.





How did we get here?




The proposed trials are the outcome of community design events, where we asked locals how they would improve their streets for people to walk, ride, and drive safely. Our aim is to build a greater sense of community in designing safer streets. That means ensuring both our team, and project outcomes, reflect the voice of Māngere.

Examples of our commitment to this is the engagement of Māngere College students in a co-design programme, and employment of locals to lead our design development, communications and implementation. Most importantly, it means weaving community design workshops into our engagement process.

The co-design group is made up of students from Māngere College and Manurewa High School who are interested in urban planning, arts, architecture and design, run by MAU Academy. The events on Bader Drive and Elmdon Street engage with local families, to share their experiences of getting around Māngere. We also created an online survey to reach more residents of Māngere in our consultation process.

Ultimately, residents, schools, and community organisations are leading the redevelopment of their streets so it reflects their needs, worldviews, and future.

This project is funded by Kāinga Ora’s Māngere Development and Auckland Transport, through Waka Kotahi’s Innovating Streets for People fund.



What we heard


    • Most people prefer to drive to work or school, which means lots of cars down Bader Drive at peak hours. The crossing outside Māngere College can feel unsafe with cars competing for road space and speeding outside of rush hour.
    • Cars park on Bader Drive close to the pedestrian crossing meaning it’s hard to see people waiting to cross or for people to see cars coming.
    • High traffic speeds on Elmdon Street make crossing the road and walking to school feel unsafe.
    • People enjoy walking around their neighbourhoods in Māngere and would like to see areas like Tararata Creek pathways made lighter and more vibrant, as well as more spaces that reflect the pride and love they have for Māngere.
    • Residents would like to see more room made on the street for people in the new apartments (corner Bader and Mackenzie), and whānau accessing Māngere College.




What do you think?

We will be launching a new community survey once the installation is complete outside of Māngere College to get your feedback. In the meantime if you have any questions or feedback please email atengagement@at.govt.nz





Page last updated: 18 June 2021, 10:12