Māngere East Streets for People

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The local community has told us that walking and crossing roads in some streets around Māngere East can feel difficult and unsafe, and traffic speed is a big factor.

A project team, including ME Family services and a community working group, was formed to help come up with some ideas for temporary pop-up street improvements that would make walking safer and easier for everyone in your neighbourhood. We are now trialling these solutions.

The Māngere East project sits alongside events and trial installations at over 30 sites across Auckland that are funded through Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s Innovating Streets for People pilot fund. Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is co-funding this project.

Involving the community

Throughout February, March, and April, we held three co-design workshops where the community working group provided input into the design of the pop-up street improvements. We also contacted and received feedback from other community members, held community activation events at local parks and schools, and put up posters at local shops.

At the workshops, we learnt people in the Māngere East community wanted their local streets to be more connected through parks and across roads, for traffic to be slower and safer, and to encourage people to get active and have fun. They also wanted the project to reflect community identities and support local artists and other providers. Based on this feedback, we developed three key objectives for the design of the changes: connected streets, slow and safe streets, and active streets.

For example, community members told us there were issues with “speeding cars and motorbikes – especially down straight roads”, “lots of people parking on footpath”, and “few seats available – usually without shelter”. We also learnt they want measures like “more humps [and] zebra crossings”, “fun activities for kids to do on the way to and from school”, and “more regular cleaning of streets and footpaths”.

Students from Māngere East Primary School also told us they want “more decorations on the road”, “more cops, less noises”, and “speed humps so people stop speeding around the street”.

Once installation of the pop-up street solutions is complete, we will hold a fourth community workshop to understand how they are working for local people.

We are keen to find out what you think about these trial solutions. Please tell us in our online survey

What changes are being trialled?

During June, we are installing temporary pop-up solutions along Yates Road, Royton Ave, and Ferguson Street to help meet the three key objectives of connected streets, slow and safe streets, and active streets. This involves trialling low-cost, temporary measures, such as pavement art, planters, public seating, speed humps, and street furniture. All artwork and seating was produced by members of the local community.

The map below gives an indication of the changes that are being trialled. See the numbers below for explanations of the pop-up solutions at each location.

Objective: Connected streets – a reason to walk

1. Greenway Circuit: walking route featuring footpath pavement journey markers, wayfinding signs and connections to existing walkways and reserves, QR code for access to heritage information and local story telling and seating/resting areas at intervals along the route. Provides us with a way to reconnect with our under-used walkways and reserves, and a circular walking route to use for exercise and enjoyment.

2. Greenway Connection Pocket Park: provides an extension of Royton Park pushing out into Royton Avenue, and includes the use of kerb build-outs to provide more space, seating, planters, trees in planters, artificial turf, seating and footpath art to create flexible spaces for us to use, enjoy and meet each other.

Objective: Slow and safe streets – easier to cross the street and slower vehicles

3. Speed Bumps: to slow vehicles down

4. Informal Pedestrian Crossing: raised table across the street and kerb build-outs to slow vehicles down and make it easier for people to cross the street. Footpath art and planters used to emphasise crossing location.

5. Existing Zebra Crossing: Footpath art and planters used to emphasise crossing location.

6. Squeezed Street Entries: raised table across the street and kerb build-outs to slow vehicles down entering the street and make it easier for people to cross the street.

Objective: Active streets – our community coming together

7. Resting Areas: Seating and planters – places to rest and pause our walking

Journey.

8. Pocket Parks: seating, planters, trees in planters, artificial turf and kerb build-outs to provide more space all used to create flexible spaces for us to use,

enjoy and meet each other.

9. Play Streets: footpath art games and challenges to make walking to school

enjoyable and fun.

10. Footpath Art and Funky Furniture: add colour, fun and surprise to our walking

journey. Used at Resting Areas and Pockets Park.

What happens after the trial?

Once the pop-up solutions have been installed, the project team and community working group will evaluate the changes. Based on community feedback, some adjustments may then be made to the design and layout, if needed.

If the trial is successful, Auckland Transport and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will seek funding to make the changes permanent.

How can you have your say?


The local community has told us that walking and crossing roads in some streets around Māngere East can feel difficult and unsafe, and traffic speed is a big factor.

A project team, including ME Family services and a community working group, was formed to help come up with some ideas for temporary pop-up street improvements that would make walking safer and easier for everyone in your neighbourhood. We are now trialling these solutions.

The Māngere East project sits alongside events and trial installations at over 30 sites across Auckland that are funded through Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s Innovating Streets for People pilot fund. Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is co-funding this project.

Involving the community

Throughout February, March, and April, we held three co-design workshops where the community working group provided input into the design of the pop-up street improvements. We also contacted and received feedback from other community members, held community activation events at local parks and schools, and put up posters at local shops.

At the workshops, we learnt people in the Māngere East community wanted their local streets to be more connected through parks and across roads, for traffic to be slower and safer, and to encourage people to get active and have fun. They also wanted the project to reflect community identities and support local artists and other providers. Based on this feedback, we developed three key objectives for the design of the changes: connected streets, slow and safe streets, and active streets.

For example, community members told us there were issues with “speeding cars and motorbikes – especially down straight roads”, “lots of people parking on footpath”, and “few seats available – usually without shelter”. We also learnt they want measures like “more humps [and] zebra crossings”, “fun activities for kids to do on the way to and from school”, and “more regular cleaning of streets and footpaths”.

Students from Māngere East Primary School also told us they want “more decorations on the road”, “more cops, less noises”, and “speed humps so people stop speeding around the street”.

Once installation of the pop-up street solutions is complete, we will hold a fourth community workshop to understand how they are working for local people.

We are keen to find out what you think about these trial solutions. Please tell us in our online survey

What changes are being trialled?

During June, we are installing temporary pop-up solutions along Yates Road, Royton Ave, and Ferguson Street to help meet the three key objectives of connected streets, slow and safe streets, and active streets. This involves trialling low-cost, temporary measures, such as pavement art, planters, public seating, speed humps, and street furniture. All artwork and seating was produced by members of the local community.

The map below gives an indication of the changes that are being trialled. See the numbers below for explanations of the pop-up solutions at each location.

Objective: Connected streets – a reason to walk

1. Greenway Circuit: walking route featuring footpath pavement journey markers, wayfinding signs and connections to existing walkways and reserves, QR code for access to heritage information and local story telling and seating/resting areas at intervals along the route. Provides us with a way to reconnect with our under-used walkways and reserves, and a circular walking route to use for exercise and enjoyment.

2. Greenway Connection Pocket Park: provides an extension of Royton Park pushing out into Royton Avenue, and includes the use of kerb build-outs to provide more space, seating, planters, trees in planters, artificial turf, seating and footpath art to create flexible spaces for us to use, enjoy and meet each other.

Objective: Slow and safe streets – easier to cross the street and slower vehicles

3. Speed Bumps: to slow vehicles down

4. Informal Pedestrian Crossing: raised table across the street and kerb build-outs to slow vehicles down and make it easier for people to cross the street. Footpath art and planters used to emphasise crossing location.

5. Existing Zebra Crossing: Footpath art and planters used to emphasise crossing location.

6. Squeezed Street Entries: raised table across the street and kerb build-outs to slow vehicles down entering the street and make it easier for people to cross the street.

Objective: Active streets – our community coming together

7. Resting Areas: Seating and planters – places to rest and pause our walking

Journey.

8. Pocket Parks: seating, planters, trees in planters, artificial turf and kerb build-outs to provide more space all used to create flexible spaces for us to use,

enjoy and meet each other.

9. Play Streets: footpath art games and challenges to make walking to school

enjoyable and fun.

10. Footpath Art and Funky Furniture: add colour, fun and surprise to our walking

journey. Used at Resting Areas and Pockets Park.

What happens after the trial?

Once the pop-up solutions have been installed, the project team and community working group will evaluate the changes. Based on community feedback, some adjustments may then be made to the design and layout, if needed.

If the trial is successful, Auckland Transport and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will seek funding to make the changes permanent.

How can you have your say?