Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Beachlands and East

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Consultation on Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Beachlands and East has now closed Thank you for having your say. The team are currently analysing all of the feedback received and will report back on key outcomes.

Planning for the future of our shoreline

We're preparing shoreline adaptation plans across the region, in partnership with mana whenua and local communities.

What shoreline adaptation plans are

Shoreline adaptation plans look at how we can adapt Auckland Council-owned land and assets to respond to coastal hazards and climate change over the next 100 years.

Recognising the environmental and landscape value of the shoreline, these plans also work to promote the preservation and restoration of the coastal environment for future generations.

How we develop strategies for shoreline adaptation plans

To help us develop strategies to manage these areas, we use:

  • coastal hazard data
  • climate change forecasts
  • values from mana whenua
  • input from infrastructure providers
  • input from the local community

Through this process, we aim to identify and document the best options for managing our coastal areas over the next century.

What we want your feedback on

To help us identify key areas of importance to the community, we want your thoughts on Auckland's eastern coastal areas, stretching from Pine Harbour in the Beachlands area down to Whakatīwai Regional Park (see map below).


We want to know what you do along the coastline and what you value about the coastal areas.


How you can have your say:

Proposed Community Objectives

Based on the information collected as part of this engagement, our team has pulled together proposed community objectives for the Beachlands and East area. Community objectives help us ensure that the adaptation strategies that we recommend reflect the needs and values of the people who live in the area. For more information on how these were developed and to see the underlying data, download our proposed community objectives presentation.

Proposed Community Objectives

  • Provide safe access with parking to the Coastal Marine Area for a range of water-based activities at a range of tide levels (e.g, swimming, sailing/boating, kiteboarding and surfing).
  • Identify existing locations for motorized boat launching where improvements will provide the greatest benefit to the wider network.
  • Enhance opportunities for pedestrian and cycling movements along the coastline, integrated with the existing coastal walking and cycling experience throughout the Beachlands and East setting.
  • Shoreline management options consider accessibility for a range of mobilities.
  • Preserve and enhance the natural environment and ecosystems and support biodiversity
  • Have accessible places within coastal reserves where people can enjoy the environment in its natural setting
  • In the short term, work with Auckland Emergency Management to develop a community resilience network across Beachlands and East.
  • Resilience of assets in hazard zones is considered priority in asset management decision-making to support service provision and ensure disruption is limited.
  • Work with Auckland Transport to develop a resilient road network for the area, which supports increased access for a diverse range of transport type and coastal access for recreation.

When you can have your say

You can have your say from 22 October, 2021 to 25 February, 2022.

Consultation on Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Beachlands and East has now closed Thank you for having your say. The team are currently analysing all of the feedback received and will report back on key outcomes.

Planning for the future of our shoreline

We're preparing shoreline adaptation plans across the region, in partnership with mana whenua and local communities.

What shoreline adaptation plans are

Shoreline adaptation plans look at how we can adapt Auckland Council-owned land and assets to respond to coastal hazards and climate change over the next 100 years.

Recognising the environmental and landscape value of the shoreline, these plans also work to promote the preservation and restoration of the coastal environment for future generations.

How we develop strategies for shoreline adaptation plans

To help us develop strategies to manage these areas, we use:

  • coastal hazard data
  • climate change forecasts
  • values from mana whenua
  • input from infrastructure providers
  • input from the local community

Through this process, we aim to identify and document the best options for managing our coastal areas over the next century.

What we want your feedback on

To help us identify key areas of importance to the community, we want your thoughts on Auckland's eastern coastal areas, stretching from Pine Harbour in the Beachlands area down to Whakatīwai Regional Park (see map below).


We want to know what you do along the coastline and what you value about the coastal areas.


How you can have your say:

Proposed Community Objectives

Based on the information collected as part of this engagement, our team has pulled together proposed community objectives for the Beachlands and East area. Community objectives help us ensure that the adaptation strategies that we recommend reflect the needs and values of the people who live in the area. For more information on how these were developed and to see the underlying data, download our proposed community objectives presentation.

Proposed Community Objectives

  • Provide safe access with parking to the Coastal Marine Area for a range of water-based activities at a range of tide levels (e.g, swimming, sailing/boating, kiteboarding and surfing).
  • Identify existing locations for motorized boat launching where improvements will provide the greatest benefit to the wider network.
  • Enhance opportunities for pedestrian and cycling movements along the coastline, integrated with the existing coastal walking and cycling experience throughout the Beachlands and East setting.
  • Shoreline management options consider accessibility for a range of mobilities.
  • Preserve and enhance the natural environment and ecosystems and support biodiversity
  • Have accessible places within coastal reserves where people can enjoy the environment in its natural setting
  • In the short term, work with Auckland Emergency Management to develop a community resilience network across Beachlands and East.
  • Resilience of assets in hazard zones is considered priority in asset management decision-making to support service provision and ensure disruption is limited.
  • Work with Auckland Transport to develop a resilient road network for the area, which supports increased access for a diverse range of transport type and coastal access for recreation.

When you can have your say

You can have your say from 22 October, 2021 to 25 February, 2022.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Are the esplanade reserves vested in Auckland Council that are zoned as Open Space – Informal Recreation governed by Section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thanks for your question. When an esplanade reserve is required under s. 230 or 236 of the Resource Management Act 1991, it is required to be set aside as a local purpose reserve for esplanade purposes under the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in and administered by Auckland Council. It remains an unclassified esplanade reserve held under the Reserves Act until the council (delegated to local boards) passes a resolution to classify the land under the Act. The local board will usually classify the land as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve but is also free to choose one of the other classifications under the Act (e.g. recreation, scenic).

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    The Reserves Act 1977 has vested a large number of esplanade reserves (e.g 577R, 601R, 781R, 368R, 730R, 852R etc) to Auckland Council (and predecessor Manukau City Council) within the "Shoreline Adaption Plans: Beachlands and East" area. Many of these vested reserves currently remain isolated and cut off from their purpose of providing public access along the coast. How is the "Shoreline Adaption Plan" going to ensure that there is a fair representation around future community values in relation to such esplanade reserves where isolation currently prohibits their utilisation for the benefit and enjoyment of the public in a manner legislated for under the Reserves Act 1977?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The development of the Franklin Local Parks Management Plan, which will cover all local parks within the Franklin Local Board area, is due to commence before the end of this year. This plan will include a review of all existing reserve management plans within the former Franklin and Manukau City Councils where they relate to local parks within the Franklin local board area. This will include local parks in the Manukau City Council Coastal & Riparian Reserves Management Plan that are within Franklin local board area. The first stage in developing this plan under the Reserves Act will be to seek the public’s views on what issues and opportunities should be considered.

    The Shoreline Adaptation Plans are including extensive community engagement using a range of in-person and online engagement events combined with digital engagement tools to capture as much feedback as possible on how our esplanade reserves and open spaces are used and valued to inform their long term management in response to coastal hazards and climate change. As Shoreline Adaptation Plans are non-statutory, results will not be formally included in the Local Parks Management Plan but the recommendations will be considered in formulating policies and management intentions for individual local parks.

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    The I409 Clevedon Waterways Precinct is included within one of the unit cells identified on the map. The development in the future of this precinct relies on the creation of a large building platform area above the 1% AEP floodplain (re Precinct A & Precinct B). These building platforms will create an obstruction that will stretch from North Road across to the Wairoa River, at an area that is located directly opposite the lawfully established stop bank structures that stretch from the Wairoa River to the Clevedon-Kawakawa Road. In reference to the above, how will the resulting adverse effects around displacement and redirection of both flood waters and coastal inundation through the development of the I409 Clevedon Waterways Precinct’s building platform at this location be identified, taken into account and planned for in the “Shoreline Adaption Plan: Beachlands and East”?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Any earthworks in the 1% AEP floodplain that are required to establish building platforms to meet minimum floor levels are required to demonstrate that they will not exacerbate flooding experienced by other sites (either upstream or downstream) of the works through the resource consenting process (Policy 20, Chapter E.36 of the AUP). As previously noted, development of the current tranche of Shoreline Adaptation Plans takes into account the best available natural hazards information to inform adaptation strategies for council-owned land and assets. Any future changes in Auckland’s natural hazards risk profile will be incorporated into future iterations of these non-statutory plans.

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    Under the Manukau City Council “Coastal & Riparian Reserves Management Plan” December 2009, the policy states that “The protection of private property will not be a consideration when assessing whether or not erosion protection works will be undertaken on public reserve land.” This plan's discussion around erosion and slope stability and attempting to defend or protect public reserves from erosion or slips in all situations outlines that it “is not a sustainable option, either financially or environmentally. Intervention can only reasonably occur in order to protect key public assets that may be under threat. Such assets may include: walkways, boat ramps, beaches, car parks, roads, pump stations and storm water outlets.” It is understood that the “Coastal & Riparian Reserves Management Plan” is still the relevant plan for Auckland Council’s management of these areas. Will the “Shoreline Adaption Plan” supersede the "Coastal & Riparian Reserves Management Plan" for the Beachlands and East areas?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. 

    The Shoreline Adaptation Plans are non-statutory guidance documents. No current legislation or policies will be superseded by the Beachlands and East Shoreline Adaptation Plan. Any future plan changes or statutory documents may choose to adopt the recommendations of the Beachlands and East Shoreline Adaptation Plan, as appropriate, but will remain subject to the  legislative requirements of the Resource Management Act, Reserves Act 1977 and Local Government Act 2002 processes. 

     

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    9. The “Coastal Management Framework for the Auckland Region” December 2017, states that “Internal guidance on the vesting of esplanade reserves and private coastal structures on or abutting Auckland Council land have been developed and are currently being trialled internally.” Will this guidance be incorporated into the “Shoreline Adaption Plan: Beachlands and East” or influence decisions being made? The "Coastal Management Framework for the Auckland Region" was dated 2017. If this internal guidance to which it referred has been adopted as policy, is it now able to be made available to the public (LOGIMA)?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The development of guidance for esplanade reserves was scoped through Auckland Councils Parks Service Asset Planning Team.  This guidance was focused on the vesting of new esplanade reserves and strips, supporting the requirements under the Resource Management Act and Auckland Unitary Plan. As draft internal guidance it has not been published or formally adopted as policy.

    The Shoreline Adaptation Plans consider all existing council-owned land and assets at the coast. Reflecting this, key stakeholders across Auckland Council (including Community Facilities and Parks Sport and Recreation) are collaborating on the development of each plan, including Beachlands and East.

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    The maintenance and operation of private stormwater systems section under Auckland Council’s “Stormwater Bylaw 2015” states as follows: (3) The owner, occupier, and manager of a premises on which there is a watercourse, stop bank, or other defence to water, must maintain that watercourse, stop bank, or other defence to water in an operational state which ensures the free flow of water. (4) Subclause (3) does not apply to any watercourses, stop banks, or other defences against water that are part of the public stormwater network. Why has Auckland Council legislated such responsibility relating to private stormwater systems but excluded public stormwater networks, where Auckland Council is responsible for prevention and mitigation of flooding?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Under the Stormwater Bylaw 2015, subclause 16(4) is intended to clarify the scope of subclause 16(3) which relates to private stormwater systems. Subclause 16(4) does not function to describe the roles and responsibilities of Auckland Council.


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    In a recent article “A Shore Thing: The 17600 coastal Auckland homes at risk from sea level rise” dated December 2021, Paul Klinac says that Auckland Council cannot start work around saving private homes until the Government reforms the RMA, because until then, it’s unclear who will have to pay to defend homes. “If we started now, it would likely be made invalid by the new Climate Change Adaption Act (CCAA), so it’s much more efficient use of ratepayer’s funds to get the science right now, and apply it to council owned assets, then we’ll be ready when the new act comes into effect,” he says. The Resource Management Act 1991 has been key legislation for over 30 years. This is a substantial length of time for the issue of whether councils are responsible for committing ratepayer’s funds to the protection of private assets against natural hazards such as flooding, tidal/coastal inundation and/or erosion to be stated as unclear and remain unresolved. What is Auckland Council’s current legal requirements and approach toward the use of ratepayer’s money for the protection of private property that are currently being adversely impacted by such natural hazards? To interpret Paul Klinac’s comments, would it suggest that Auckland Council’s delayed response around addressing this issue until the new CCAA with regard to private assets is based on either: a) the expectation of a shift toward Council legislative responsibility around committing ratepayer’s funds for their protection and resilience; or b) is it expected that the CCAA legislation will preclude councils from any such responsibility and liability?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. There is no general statutory duty (under the RMA or otherwise) for Council to protect private property from being impacted by natural hazards. Auckland Council is still awaiting guidance through the Climate Change Adaptation Act regarding the extent Central and/or Local Government might contribute towards the protection of private property in the future. 

     

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    In a recent article “A Shore Thing: Not enough money ‘to hold back the sea’, but defence is possible” it is stated that “other coastal defences have been built by developers and landowners, which often, once completed, become the responsibility of the council to maintain.” Based on the statement above, is it Auckland Council’s legislative responsibility to maintain such defences against tidal inundation (e.g. stop bank structures, etc) and stormwater assets (culvert pipes and floodgates) that have been historically established within the land area of an esplanade reserve being vested to council?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. There is no legislative or other requirement for Council to defend land against the sea.  Where there are structures on/under Council land, it falls to the Council, as owner of the land to maintain those structures (subject to any other arrangements e.g. under an encumbrance).  However Council has a discretion as to whether and how it does so.  

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    Tonkin & Taylor (17 September 2010) were asked to identify areas to be designated as Stormwater Management Area (SMAs) for inclusion in the proposed Clevedon Village plan change (now AUP - I408 Clevedon Precinct). T & T’s recommendation as to the locations and approximate area to designate for Stormwater Management (as per each site- specific design) for twelve Stormwater Management Areas, was their inclusion as part of the changes proposed to the Operative District Plan at Clevedon. However, these recommendations were ditched during the PAUP process in favour of the 1% AEP floodplain being declared as the designated Stormwater Management Area for the I408 Clevedon Precinct. The I409 Clevedon Waterways Precinct states that there will be implementation of a stormwater management network to manage stormwater runoff generated on-site that uses integrated stormwater management that maintains or enhances the ecological function of the existing streams and the Wairoa River. Stormwater Management devices to fully mitigate the stormwater discharges from accessways and roads on the canal and river water quality. The I409 Stormwater management devices activity status of Restricted Discretionary (RD) requires Auckland Council to restrict matters of discretion to stormwater management, effects on coastal processes and water quality. Council will consider the relevant assessment criteria, the extent to which: • the roading layout provides safe and attractive, nonlinear transport routes that maximise the safety of cyclists and pedestrians, integrates stormwater treatment devices and landscaping, and are safe with respect to natural hazards; • infrastructure for stormwater, wastewater and water supply are designed to ensure minimisation of water use, stormwater and wastewater generation and maximise water re-use. The I408 Clevedon Precinct is only in the early stages of development, with currently no indication as to the development timeframe for the I409 Clevedon Waterways Precinct. Such developments (I408, I409 and other non-related development upstream) will ultimately create within the lower part of the Wairoa Catchment: 1. an escalation in the volume of stormwater run-off that requires both diversion and discharge; and 2. the displacement of exacerbated floodwaters and coastal inundation. With such a large increase of impervious surface areas not yet a quantified reality for such future development within the Wairoa catchment, how will future adverse effects (flooding, coastal inundation and erosion) relating to such further development be identified, taken into account and planned for in the “Shoreline Adaption Plan: Beachlands and East”?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The first iteration of shoreline adaptation plans for Auckland are being developed based on our current, best available natural hazard information and supporting datasets. This includes our regional coastal inundation mapping (Auckland Council, 2020), regional coastal erosion Mapping (Auckland Council, 2021) and catchment flood modelling for the area.

    Auckland’s future risk profile is dictated by a range of factors including future climate emissions and future changes in land use. Recognising this, the Shoreline Adaptation Plans are intended to be reviewed and refined through an iterative cycle. This approach will enable any changes in natural hazards or their drivers to be taken into account and recommended adaptation strategies to be reviewed, if required. This follows international best practice such as the United Kingdom’s approach to publishing revised Shoreline Management Plans every ten years. 

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    Section 77, Resource Management Act 1991 sets out rules about esplanade reserves that are vested to council. As rural lifestyle subdivision has become limited across the Rural-Coastal zone (Auckland Unitary Plan, Chapter 19) the existing esplanade reserves will as a result continue to endure permanent isolation. Should it not be of concern that these esplanade reserves will not receive a fair representation due to lack of utilisation for their primary purpose of providing public access to the area that stretches along the coast between Duder Regional Park and Waitawa Regional Park?

    dig61 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your question. As recognised under s229 of the RMA, esplanade reserves provide a range of functions including:

    • Safe public access and recreational use
    • Maintaining and enhancing the natural functioning and water quality of the adjoining water body
    • Preserving natural values, geological and landscape features and the natural character of an area
    • Safeguard historic heritage places and sites of cultural significance
    • Mitigating natural hazards, taking into effect long term effects of climate change

    Through development of each Shoreline Adaptation Plan, we work with an across-council project team including stakeholders in Community Facilities that own and manage our esplanade reserves, alongside specialists in Parks, Sports and Recreation and Community Investment. Their expertise, combined with feedback from the local community and results of the coastal hazards risk assessment is used in conjunction to determine appropriate long term adaptation strategies for each discrete coastal cell. Part of this process is to recognise the range of functions of esplanade reserves and ensure the unique character and objectives of each is provided for.

Page last updated: 06 Jul 2022, 10:44 AM