Questions and answers for the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (long-term plan) consultation

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During the consultation we answered your questions about the 10-year budget.

You can read the answers to those questions below.

During the consultation we answered your questions about the 10-year budget.

You can read the answers to those questions below.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Kia Ora, Why doesn’t the Council plant fruit trees in public places so people can help themselves to the fresh fruit that are in season; citrus for winter and stone fruit for summer?

    ClenPrime asked 2 months ago

    Kia ora 

    Thank you for your question. 

    Council currently supports the community to plant fruit trees or fruit tree orchards on parks, generally through the Landowner Approval process. These sites are scattered around the region.

    The New Zealand Fruit and Food map shows locations where fruit trees or community gardens can be found.  

    Not every park is suitable for fruit trees, and each site has to be considered on a case-by-case basis. Several local boards, including Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden, are actively looking into their provision of fruit trees within parks, and opportunities to increase planting in the future. Howick Local Board supports local schools to grow orchards through their fruit trees in schools programme.  

    Ngā mihi

    Auckland Council Engagement Team

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    I wanted to get update on Hayr road and mt albert road intersection development. Where would I find that information?

    Shivangi asked 2 months ago

    Kia ora Shivangi 

    Thank you for your question. 

    We reached out to Auckland Transport and they have advised that they are currently finalising the design for the intersection of Mt Albert Road, Hayr Road and Dornwell Road. Once the design has been confirmed they will be carrying out community consultation. Subject to the outcome of the consultation the project is planned for delivery in the 2021/2022 financial year. 

    Keep an eye on the Puketāpapa Local Board Facebook Page or the Auckland Transport Have Your Say page for updates on the consultation. 

    Many thanks 

    Auckland Council Engagement Team. 

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    Climate Change: Could you please consider introducing a by-law that requires all new builds of high rise apartment complexes to have electric car charging stations located in their carparks?

    Gill W asked about 2 months ago

    Kia ora Gill

     Auckland Council supports the introduction of more electric vehicle charging stations across the region. Auckland Transport and electric vehicle charging provider, ChargeNet NZ, have formed a strategic partnership to install 60 electric vehicle charging stations around Auckland. There are currently 48 free to use charging stations installed in car parks across Auckland. Further information and locations here: EV charging locations

     Auckland Transport has also installed two electric vehicle chargers at Devonport Wharf car park, which are free to use and are part of AT’s 12-month Smart City trial.

     Aside from this our tools under legislation to encourage installation of more electric vehicle charging stations are unfortunately quite limited. We could not introduce a bylaw to encourage the installation of electric vehicle charging stations because bylaws are intended to deal with impacts of people’s behaviour on public health, safety, nuisance and misuse of council controlled public places. 

     The Auckland Unitary Plan does not currently contain any provisions relating to electric vehicle charging stations. The Auckland Unitary Plan is concerned with land use planning and environmental effects- electric car charging is outside the scope of its powers. 

     Auckland Council will continue to advocate to central government for more action to encourage installation of electric vehicle charging stations in the Auckland region.

     

    Best wishes

    Lucy

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    My question is, is there any plan to set up cafes at our major parks? I live not far from Barry Curtis park which is a big park. In London when I visited 2years ago the parks had cafe/coffee bars attached so after playing with my grandchildren we were able to get a lunch or an ice cream. I would like to see something similar established here.

    Elissa Borland asked about 2 months ago

    Kia ora Elissa, thanks for your feedback. I will pass this on to the analysis team.

    There will be a further opportunity to share your ideas for regional parks in the second phase of the Regional Parks Management Plan review. You can follow the project here and take part when it opens: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/regional-parks-management-plan 

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    How/where can I access the following documents: (1) the Business Case for merging the various Auckland councils into one to form the Super City?; and (2) the Post Implementation Review (PIR), reporting on whether the Super City project delivered on the assumptions made in the original business case justification. Hope to hear back soon. Thanks and regards,

    Coolamon_Boy asked 2 months ago

    We were able to find these two decommissioned websites which have some background to the Royal Commission on Auckland Governance and the resultant Government decisions.

     https://www.dia.govt.nz/Decommissioned-websites---Royal-Commission-on-Auckland-Governance 

    https://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/webarchive/wayback/20090504234210/http://www.auckland.govt.nz/web/cms_rcauckland.nsf/weblivehome/ITSO-7QJ4WY?OpenDocument 

    If you need further information you can always make a LGOIMA request through our website.

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    With a 5% and then 3.5% rate increase, 1. How do you propose those on a fixed income will manage to afford the increase? 2. As an employer do you plan to consider how your own low paid "employees" will afford the increase? 3. Is there an uncomplicated document to show how you are controlling the large salaries of more senior employees?

    Alan J Shirley asked 2 months ago
    1. Auckland Council provides help for low income households through a number of programmes, including property rates rebates and postponement of property rates payments. Auckland Council also introduced the rates postponement for ratepayers financially impacted by COVID-19 programme in the Emergency Budget adopted last year. More information on assistance available can be found here.
    2. Auckland Council has committed to providing a Living Wage to employees and contracted cleaners.
    3. For Auckland Council employees, salary details are recorded in our annual reports.  The last report to 30 June 2020 is available at aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.
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    Can you please provide the following information: 1. Number of property rate payers, Residential and commercial, 2020 and expected in 2030 2. Income from the rate payers in question 1, in 2020 and 2030 3. How much of the rate payer income was diverted to Watercare in 2020 and how much is expected to be diverted over the life of this budget? 4. What is the council's policy regarding targeted rates, i.e. where a defined geographical community pays for a particular council project? 5. How much income is the council expected to receive form the Auckland petrol tax over the life of this budget? 6. The climate change emergency declared by the council does not appear to apply to the CCO's. If not why not? If so, what steps are the council taking to ensure compliance with the declaration's aims?

    ericenge asked 2 months ago

    Kia ora 

    Thank you for your question. 

    1. Number of property rate payers, Residential and commercial, 2020 and expected in 2030

    In the 2019/2020 year there were 568,753 rating units (including non-rateable properties). In the 2029/2030 financial year we forecast there will be 689,709 rating units (including non-rateable properties). As some individuals may own more than one rating unit we have provided rating units rather than ratepayers.

    2. Income from the rate payers in question 1, in 2020 and 2030

    Our Annual Report for 2019/2020 shows we collected $1,867,000 (excl GST) in rates. The prospective financial statements in the draft Long-term Plan 2021-2031 forecasts that we will collect $ 3,290,808 (excl GST) in rates in the 2029/2030 year.

    3. How much of the rate payer income was diverted to Watercare in 2020 and how much is expected to be diverted over the life of this budget?

    Watercare is funded through its own charges (connection and volumetric charges). Infrastructure Growth Charges and borrowings fund the cost of growth related capital investment. 

    4. What is the council's policy regarding targeted rates, i.e. where a defined geographical community pays for a particular council project?

    The Revenue and Financing Policy sets out how the council uses targeted rates. The relevant sections from the policy are below.

    Targeted Rates

    • Appropriate to fund operating expenditure (including projects to support growth) where one or more of the following apply:
    • that benefit a specific group of ratepayers
    • to incentivise land owners to develop land in response to a commitment to the provision of infrastructure
    • to provide certainty of the council recovering its costs
    • where greater transparency in funding the cost of the activity is desirable
    • where an individual or a group of ratepayers voluntarily chooses to adopt the rate, such as for business improvement districts or the Retrofit Your Home scheme 
    • where the rate is for a specific service, or bundle of services, such as for waste collection.

    Appropriate to fund capital expenditure projects (including projects to support growth) where one or more of the following apply:

    • that benefit a specific group of ratepayers
    • to incentivise land owners to develop land in response to a commitment to the provision of infrastructure
    • to provide certainty of the council recovering its costs
    • where greater transparency in funding the cost of the activity is desirable.

    Revenue raised by a targeted rate can only be used to fund the activities for which it was raised. For a targeted rate applied to properties within a geographical area to fund activities within that area the revenue may only be used for the purposes for which it was raised in that area.

    5. How much income is the council expected to receive form the Auckland petrol tax over the life of this budget?

    The Regional Fuel Tax (RFT) is a key funding source, introduced in the 10-year Budget 2018-28, to support investment in additional transport infrastructure and services.

    The tax is set at 10 cents plus GST per litre of fuel (both petrol and diesel), with appropriate rebates for non-transport and off-road uses. The council will be consulting on an amendment to the current Regional Fuel Tax scheme alongside consulting on the Regional Land Transport Plan.

    After analysis of historical revenue and COVID-19 impacts, our projections of annual revenue remain at approximately $150 million per annum.

    The funding provided by Regional Fuel Tax is due to end in 2027/2028. This 10-year Budget assumes a continued funding stream at this level for the last three years of the plan (2028/2029 – 2030/2031). This could be in the form of an extended or new Regional Fuel Tax or a new funding tool altogether.

    6. The climate change emergency declared by the council does not appear to apply to the CCO's. If not why not? If so, what steps are the council taking to ensure compliance with the declaration's aim

    Auckland Council expects that all Council Controlled Organisations will prioritise climate action, through taking action to reduce emissions and supporting Auckland to adapt to the impacts of climate change. This expectation has been communicated in various ways. For example, the Mayor’s letter of expectation to Auckland Transport for their Statement of Intent 2020-2023 stated that ‘Addressing the challenges that climate change presents for Auckland continues to be a priority for the council group. This was highlighted in the council’s declaration of a climate emergency commitment to a 1.5°c target for the region and the ongoing work on Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework (ACAF). Council expect CCOs’ statements of intent to outline how they will continue to support the achievement of these regional climate commitments and support the ongoing development and delivery of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.’

    All of the Council Controlled Organisations have proposed actions in the next draft ten-year budget both to reduce their own organisational emissions and to support Aucklanders to achieve regional emissions reductions. They are also contributing to our climate adaptation goals, through supporting Auckland’s transport, water supply, wastewater systems, economy and new developments to be more resilient to future climate impacts. Auckland Council seeks regular updates from our Council Controlled Organisations on the climate outcomes they are delivering and we publish an annual update on how all parts of the Council family are responding to climate risk. These organisations will also be asked to report back regularly on their progress in implementing Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan from 2021.

    Ngā mihi

    Auckland Council Engagement Team. 

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    I have heard that there is an intention, at some stage, to sell "Heart of the Bays" at Browns Bay to developers. Is this true?

    Fay Weatherly asked 2 months ago

    Kia ora Fay 

    Thank you for your question. We have reached out to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area Manager and received a response that they have never heard this being suggested. 

    They also explain that due to the underlying status of the land as recreation and local purposes it would be a long and arduous process to get to a point that the site would be for sale. There are also community leases in place for the current users which secure tenancies for the building for a number of years. 

    Kind regards 

    Auckland Council Engagement Team. 

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    I would like to see the actual low-level budget details on a year by year basis showing individual line codes for expenditure and proposed increases by year compared to the previous year and this year/last year's actuals showing increases/decreases in both dollar and percentage terms (year by year). An Excel spreadsheet format would be best if possible. This would be the lowest level building blocks of the high-level executive summary type stuff you have provided for feedback. I want to see the details of what makes up the billions in expenditure and the budgeting manager's comments and justifications for such huge monetary spend of ratepayer funds.

    Coolamon_Boy asked 3 months ago

    Kia ora Coolamon_Boy 

    Apologies for the delay in responding to your question. The budget consists of somewhere between 50,000 -100,000 lines and we do not have the capacity to respond to a request of this nature. However, you will find tables with much of financial information you've requested in the Supporting Information Document.  

    In the supporting information the best places to start would be Section 2.2 (from page 147) which has the Prospective Financial Statements (including notes and assumptions) & Section 3 (from page 199) which has more detailed information for each activity area, including prospective Funding Impact Statements. Rates make up around 40% of Auckland Council's revenue. 

    If you have a more specific question you can come back to us. 

    Ngā mihi

    Auckland Council Engagement Team. 

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    RE: Transport and reducing emissions How is the council addressing the issue cyclists have in getting from the North Shore to city? At the moment cyclists cannot take their bikes across on the buses and the ferries are very expensive. Emma Tolmie

    Emma T asked 2 months ago

    Kia ora Emma 

    Thanks for your question. The Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) is developed by Auckland Transport (AT) together with the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) and KiwiRail to respond to growth and challenges facing Auckland over the next decade. The draft 2021-2031 Regional Land Transport Plan proposes to deliver The Northern Pathway which will provide a significant new regional walking and cycling connection between Westhaven in the city centre and Akoranga on the North Shore. This will provide a critical missing link in Auckland’s cycle network. You can have your say on the draft RLTP from 29 March 2021. 

    Ngā mihi

    Auckland Council Engagement Team.