How the Annual Budget 2022/2023 will affect your rates

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General rate change

The average increase in general rates across all existing properties is proposed to be 3.5 per cent, as set out in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Visit our website to see the proposed rates for your property:

Total rate change

The total rates changes for the average value properties in the residential and the business categories respectively are set out in the tables below.

The average (or mean) property value is the total value of properties divided by the number of properties.

This compares with the median, which is the value at which 50 per cent of properties are above this level and 50 per cent below. The average value property is used in these tables because they most clearly reflect the proposed changes to rates without the distortions caused by the revaluation.

The total rate change includes general rates, the Water Quality Targeted Rate, the Natural Environment Targeted Rate, the proposed Climate Action Targeted Rate and rates for waste management including the waste base service charge and the standard refuse charge.

The proposed action to respond to climate change, partly funded by a targeted rate, would result in a higher overall rates change for 2022/23 than indicated in the council's Financial Strategy as set out in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

The numbers for the Waste Base Service Targeted Rate and the Standard Refuse Targeted Rate are calculated based on the cost information (including inflation assumptions) available at the time the consultation materials were developed. They are subject to change.

The final figures will be adopted in June after taking into consideration any cost changes since consultation, including more up-to-date assumptions on inflation.

Proposed rates for the average value residential property

Graphic of a house

  • Average capital value 2021/2022: $1,082,000.
  • Average capital value 2022/2023: $1,434,500.
  • Average increase: $352,500 (32.6 per cent).

Change in proposed rates compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateDollar value changePortion of total % changeDollar value change per week
General rates$107.623.46%$2.07
Water Quality Targeted Rate$2.160.07%$0.04
Natural Environment Targeted Rate-$0.17-0.01%$0.00
Waste base charge-$7.08-0.23%-$0.14
Standard refuse$15.280.49%$0.29
Climate Action Targeted Rate$69.332.23%$1.33
Total rates
$187.14
6.02%
$3.60


Proposed rates for 2022/2023 compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateAverage rates 2021/2022Average rates 2022/2023
General rates$2,698.48$2,806.10
Water Quality Targeted Rate$69.03$71.19
Natural Environment Targeted Rate$46.81$46.64
Waste base charge$142.70$135.62
Standard refuse$150.06$165.34
Climate Action Targeted RateNot applicable$69.33
Total rates
$3,107.08
$3,294.22


Proposed total rates increases for residential properties of different capital values

The data in the table assumes average increase in property value.

Capital value (CV)Proposed increase in dollarsProposed increase percent
$500,000$815.15%
$750,000$1095.51%
$1,000,000$1385.75%
$1,200,000 (median CV)$1605.90%
$1,434,500 (average CV)$1876.02%
$2,000,000$2516.23%
$3,000,000$3656.43%


Proposed rates for the average value business property

Graphic of a shop

  • Average capital value 2021/2022: $2,905,500
  • Average capital value 2022/2023: $3,974,000
  • Average increase: $1,068,500 (36.8% per cent)

Change in proposed rates compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateDollar value changePortion of total % changeDollar value change per week
General rates$422.632.43%$8.13
Water Quality Targeted Rate$16.390.09%$0.32
Natural Environment Targeted Rate$3.240.02%$0.06
Waste base charge-$7.08-0.04%-$0.14
Climate Action Targeted Rate$328.691.89%$6.32
Total rates
$763.874.38%$14.69


Proposed rates for 2022/2023 compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateAverage rates 2021/2022Average rates 2022/2023
General rates$16,732.09$17,154.72
Water Quality Targeted Rate$325.74$342.13
Natural Environment Targeted Rate$220.91$224.15
Waste base charge$142.70$135.62
Climate Action Targeted RateNot applicable$328.69
Total rates
$17,421.44
$18,185.31


Proposed total rates increases for business properties of different capital values

The data in the table assumes average increase in property value.

Capital value (CV)Proposed increase in dollarsProposed increase percent
$500,000$1043.82%
$750,000$1514.01%
$1,000,000$1994.11%
$1,150,000 (median CV)$2274.16%
$2,000,000$3894.29%
$3,974,000 (average CV)$7644.38%
$10,000,000$1,9094.45%


Rates for different types of properties

While the average general rates increase across all properties is 3.5 per cent, the average increase for an average-value residential property is higher, at 3.99 per cent, due to:

  • A long-term strategy to lower the proportion of general rates raised from business properties, which means the proportion for residential properties is increasing. This accounts for about 0.39 per cent of the average-value residential property rates increase.
  • The average residential property value rising faster than those of farm and lifestyle properties, meaning a slightly higher share of rates will be paid by residential properties. This accounts for about 0.1 per cent of the increase.

We have included the standard refuse rate for residential properties as it provides a useful proxy for these costs across the region, including areas where this rate is not applied.

It is not included for business properties as it only applies to some business properties in the former Auckland City Council area.

Revaluation impact

We revalue properties to ensure we continue to set rates fairly between properties and that rates reflect movements in property values.

This ensures that over time, similar value properties are paying similar rates.

New valuations don’t affect the amount of money we collect from rates, it just helps us work out everyone’s share of rates.

An increase in your property value does not necessarily mean you pay more in rates. It will vary depending on how much your property value changes compared with other properties.

Council valuations do not reflect your property’s market value and should not be used for insurance, mortgage or marketing purposes.

There are independent local registered valuers who can assist you in determining your market value. Our valuers work with independent organisation Quotable Value (QV) to determine the values and the Valuer-General audit their work.

This means Aucklanders can have confidence in the accuracy of the valuations and the process.

We expect the new valuation notices to be sent to all 590,000 properties in March 2022.

Find more information

For more information on revaluations, see page 96 of our supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

This analysis is based on new capital values that are subject to certification by the Valuer-General and the objection process, and therefore may change.

Rating of Whenua Māori

We currently support Māori to retain, develop and use their whenua through our Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy, and our Cultural Initiatives Fund, which provides assistance for marae and papakāinga development.

We are now reviewing our Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy, along with our Rates Remission and Postponement Policy and our Revenue and Financing Policy, to meet new legislative requirements to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993.

These principles include support for Māori owners to retain, utilise and develop their land. Our Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy already provides a range of remissions which support the achievement of these principles.

Our current policy provides support beyond the requirements of the new legislation by encompassing a wider definition of land held by Māori.

One of the changes we are proposing now is a new remission for Māori land under development, to support the new legislative requirement for council to consider remissions under section 114a of the Local Government (Rating) Act.

This is being consulted on separately, but at the same time as the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The changes that we are proposing to each of the policies are:

  • Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy:
    • Introducing a rates remission scheme for Māori land under development.
    • Introducing an objective to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993.
    • Clarifying the definition of Māori land.

For more information, see Changes to financial policies for Whenua Māori.

  • Rates Remission and Postponement Policy:
    • Introducing an objective to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993 to clarify the definition of Māori land.

For more information, see Changes to financial policies for Whenua Māori.

  • Revenue and Financing Policy:
    • Introducing a new funding principle to consider our obligations under Section 102(3A) of the Local Government Act 2002 to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993.

For more information, see Changes to financial policies for Whenua Māori or Revenue and Financing Policy 2022.

Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate (APTR)

The Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate (APTR) is a rate paid only by owners of properties such as motels, hotels and Airbnb properties.

It is used to fund half of Auckland Unlimited’s expenditure on visitor attraction and major events.

In response to the COVID pandemic, we reduced spending on these activities, and suspended the APTR for the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 years.

We had planned to restart the APTR in 2022/2023, which would have generated around $14.8 million of additional funding for visitor attraction and major events.

A recent court ruling on the APTR means we are unable to charge the rate next year. We could instead fund this investment through the general rate, by increasing rates for all ratepayers by an average of 0.8 per cent.

We do not know how long the disruption to Auckland’s visitor economy caused by COVID-19 will last. Given this uncertainty, and the current financial pressures we are facing, we do not consider investment in visitor and event activities to be a priority.

As such, we are proposing to reduce the budget for visitor attraction and major events to $19.9 million for 2022/2023.

Find more information

For more information, see page 95 of our supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

Rating Policy Changes

Excluding rural zone land from the Urban Rating Area

There are 30 rural zoned properties on Waiheke Island that are located inside the Urban Rating Area. Under our current rating policy, these properties are classed as urban and pay urban rates.

This is inconsistent with how we treat rural zoned properties in other parts of the region.

We are proposing to exclude all rural zoned land on Waiheke Island from the Urban Rating Area. This will mean that these properties will be rated the same as other rural properties in the region.

Residential access ways

We are also proposing to clarify the rating of residential access ways. Multi-unit developments will often be accessed through a shared driveway or private land that is jointly owned by all owners of units in the development.

Increasingly, these access ways are being established as a separate rateable property. We propose to rate these access ways as residential use where the properties they provide access to are residential.

Find more information

For more information, see page 96 of our supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

You should know

The rates information here is an edited version of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 rates pages.

See pages 46-47 and 50-51 of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 document (PDF 10MB) for more information.

General rate change

The average increase in general rates across all existing properties is proposed to be 3.5 per cent, as set out in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Visit our website to see the proposed rates for your property:

Total rate change

The total rates changes for the average value properties in the residential and the business categories respectively are set out in the tables below.

The average (or mean) property value is the total value of properties divided by the number of properties.

This compares with the median, which is the value at which 50 per cent of properties are above this level and 50 per cent below. The average value property is used in these tables because they most clearly reflect the proposed changes to rates without the distortions caused by the revaluation.

The total rate change includes general rates, the Water Quality Targeted Rate, the Natural Environment Targeted Rate, the proposed Climate Action Targeted Rate and rates for waste management including the waste base service charge and the standard refuse charge.

The proposed action to respond to climate change, partly funded by a targeted rate, would result in a higher overall rates change for 2022/23 than indicated in the council's Financial Strategy as set out in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

The numbers for the Waste Base Service Targeted Rate and the Standard Refuse Targeted Rate are calculated based on the cost information (including inflation assumptions) available at the time the consultation materials were developed. They are subject to change.

The final figures will be adopted in June after taking into consideration any cost changes since consultation, including more up-to-date assumptions on inflation.

Proposed rates for the average value residential property

Graphic of a house

  • Average capital value 2021/2022: $1,082,000.
  • Average capital value 2022/2023: $1,434,500.
  • Average increase: $352,500 (32.6 per cent).

Change in proposed rates compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateDollar value changePortion of total % changeDollar value change per week
General rates$107.623.46%$2.07
Water Quality Targeted Rate$2.160.07%$0.04
Natural Environment Targeted Rate-$0.17-0.01%$0.00
Waste base charge-$7.08-0.23%-$0.14
Standard refuse$15.280.49%$0.29
Climate Action Targeted Rate$69.332.23%$1.33
Total rates
$187.14
6.02%
$3.60


Proposed rates for 2022/2023 compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateAverage rates 2021/2022Average rates 2022/2023
General rates$2,698.48$2,806.10
Water Quality Targeted Rate$69.03$71.19
Natural Environment Targeted Rate$46.81$46.64
Waste base charge$142.70$135.62
Standard refuse$150.06$165.34
Climate Action Targeted RateNot applicable$69.33
Total rates
$3,107.08
$3,294.22


Proposed total rates increases for residential properties of different capital values

The data in the table assumes average increase in property value.

Capital value (CV)Proposed increase in dollarsProposed increase percent
$500,000$815.15%
$750,000$1095.51%
$1,000,000$1385.75%
$1,200,000 (median CV)$1605.90%
$1,434,500 (average CV)$1876.02%
$2,000,000$2516.23%
$3,000,000$3656.43%


Proposed rates for the average value business property

Graphic of a shop

  • Average capital value 2021/2022: $2,905,500
  • Average capital value 2022/2023: $3,974,000
  • Average increase: $1,068,500 (36.8% per cent)

Change in proposed rates compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateDollar value changePortion of total % changeDollar value change per week
General rates$422.632.43%$8.13
Water Quality Targeted Rate$16.390.09%$0.32
Natural Environment Targeted Rate$3.240.02%$0.06
Waste base charge-$7.08-0.04%-$0.14
Climate Action Targeted Rate$328.691.89%$6.32
Total rates
$763.874.38%$14.69


Proposed rates for 2022/2023 compared to 2021/2022

Type of rateAverage rates 2021/2022Average rates 2022/2023
General rates$16,732.09$17,154.72
Water Quality Targeted Rate$325.74$342.13
Natural Environment Targeted Rate$220.91$224.15
Waste base charge$142.70$135.62
Climate Action Targeted RateNot applicable$328.69
Total rates
$17,421.44
$18,185.31


Proposed total rates increases for business properties of different capital values

The data in the table assumes average increase in property value.

Capital value (CV)Proposed increase in dollarsProposed increase percent
$500,000$1043.82%
$750,000$1514.01%
$1,000,000$1994.11%
$1,150,000 (median CV)$2274.16%
$2,000,000$3894.29%
$3,974,000 (average CV)$7644.38%
$10,000,000$1,9094.45%


Rates for different types of properties

While the average general rates increase across all properties is 3.5 per cent, the average increase for an average-value residential property is higher, at 3.99 per cent, due to:

  • A long-term strategy to lower the proportion of general rates raised from business properties, which means the proportion for residential properties is increasing. This accounts for about 0.39 per cent of the average-value residential property rates increase.
  • The average residential property value rising faster than those of farm and lifestyle properties, meaning a slightly higher share of rates will be paid by residential properties. This accounts for about 0.1 per cent of the increase.

We have included the standard refuse rate for residential properties as it provides a useful proxy for these costs across the region, including areas where this rate is not applied.

It is not included for business properties as it only applies to some business properties in the former Auckland City Council area.

Revaluation impact

We revalue properties to ensure we continue to set rates fairly between properties and that rates reflect movements in property values.

This ensures that over time, similar value properties are paying similar rates.

New valuations don’t affect the amount of money we collect from rates, it just helps us work out everyone’s share of rates.

An increase in your property value does not necessarily mean you pay more in rates. It will vary depending on how much your property value changes compared with other properties.

Council valuations do not reflect your property’s market value and should not be used for insurance, mortgage or marketing purposes.

There are independent local registered valuers who can assist you in determining your market value. Our valuers work with independent organisation Quotable Value (QV) to determine the values and the Valuer-General audit their work.

This means Aucklanders can have confidence in the accuracy of the valuations and the process.

We expect the new valuation notices to be sent to all 590,000 properties in March 2022.

Find more information

For more information on revaluations, see page 96 of our supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

This analysis is based on new capital values that are subject to certification by the Valuer-General and the objection process, and therefore may change.

Rating of Whenua Māori

We currently support Māori to retain, develop and use their whenua through our Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy, and our Cultural Initiatives Fund, which provides assistance for marae and papakāinga development.

We are now reviewing our Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy, along with our Rates Remission and Postponement Policy and our Revenue and Financing Policy, to meet new legislative requirements to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993.

These principles include support for Māori owners to retain, utilise and develop their land. Our Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy already provides a range of remissions which support the achievement of these principles.

Our current policy provides support beyond the requirements of the new legislation by encompassing a wider definition of land held by Māori.

One of the changes we are proposing now is a new remission for Māori land under development, to support the new legislative requirement for council to consider remissions under section 114a of the Local Government (Rating) Act.

This is being consulted on separately, but at the same time as the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The changes that we are proposing to each of the policies are:

  • Māori Land Rates Remissions and Postponement Policy:
    • Introducing a rates remission scheme for Māori land under development.
    • Introducing an objective to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993.
    • Clarifying the definition of Māori land.

For more information, see Changes to financial policies for Whenua Māori.

  • Rates Remission and Postponement Policy:
    • Introducing an objective to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993 to clarify the definition of Māori land.

For more information, see Changes to financial policies for Whenua Māori.

  • Revenue and Financing Policy:
    • Introducing a new funding principle to consider our obligations under Section 102(3A) of the Local Government Act 2002 to support the principles set out in the Preamble to Te Ture Whenua Māori Act 1993.

For more information, see Changes to financial policies for Whenua Māori or Revenue and Financing Policy 2022.

Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate (APTR)

The Accommodation Provider Targeted Rate (APTR) is a rate paid only by owners of properties such as motels, hotels and Airbnb properties.

It is used to fund half of Auckland Unlimited’s expenditure on visitor attraction and major events.

In response to the COVID pandemic, we reduced spending on these activities, and suspended the APTR for the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 years.

We had planned to restart the APTR in 2022/2023, which would have generated around $14.8 million of additional funding for visitor attraction and major events.

A recent court ruling on the APTR means we are unable to charge the rate next year. We could instead fund this investment through the general rate, by increasing rates for all ratepayers by an average of 0.8 per cent.

We do not know how long the disruption to Auckland’s visitor economy caused by COVID-19 will last. Given this uncertainty, and the current financial pressures we are facing, we do not consider investment in visitor and event activities to be a priority.

As such, we are proposing to reduce the budget for visitor attraction and major events to $19.9 million for 2022/2023.

Find more information

For more information, see page 95 of our supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

Rating Policy Changes

Excluding rural zone land from the Urban Rating Area

There are 30 rural zoned properties on Waiheke Island that are located inside the Urban Rating Area. Under our current rating policy, these properties are classed as urban and pay urban rates.

This is inconsistent with how we treat rural zoned properties in other parts of the region.

We are proposing to exclude all rural zoned land on Waiheke Island from the Urban Rating Area. This will mean that these properties will be rated the same as other rural properties in the region.

Residential access ways

We are also proposing to clarify the rating of residential access ways. Multi-unit developments will often be accessed through a shared driveway or private land that is jointly owned by all owners of units in the development.

Increasingly, these access ways are being established as a separate rateable property. We propose to rate these access ways as residential use where the properties they provide access to are residential.

Find more information

For more information, see page 96 of our supporting information document (PDF 8MB).

You should know

The rates information here is an edited version of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 rates pages.

See pages 46-47 and 50-51 of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 document (PDF 10MB) for more information.

Page last updated: 28 Mar 2022, 06:05 PM