Animal Management Bylaw Review

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link


Every day Aucklanders interact with animals in ways that benefit their mental and physical wellbeing: with their pets at home for companionship, with animals in public to connect with nature, or for recreation such as horse riding.

Sometimes the way people interact with animals causes a problem. A poorly maintained chicken coop may create an odour nuisance, or the feeding of wild animals may attract pests, for example.

The Animal Management Bylaw 2015 enables the council to regulate the keeping of animals to minimise risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and the misuse of council-controlled public places.


How Auckland Council helps maintain human-animal bonds

We make rules about animal ownership and interaction to minimise risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and misuse of council-controlled public places.

We are proposing changes to the Animal Management Bylaw 2015 and associated controls to help improve the rules about animal ownership and interaction and make these rules easier to read and understand.

The main proposals are to:

  • incorporate rules from another bylaw about the feeding of animals on private property
  • update the definitions, structure, format and wording of the Bylaw and controls to make them easier to read and understand.
  • Require approval to keep more than two standard beehives on urban premises with a land area less than 2000 square metres (no approval currently required). Note: Council has heard a range of views about limits on beehives in urban areas and is seeking feedback:
    1. on allowing more or fewer beehives without approval than the proposed two
    2. on limits for different sized urban premises than the proposed 2000 square metres


Other aspects of the Bylaw, controls and their implementation remain unchanged, for example:

  • the Bylaw focuses on the impact of animals on people
  • matters already covered in existing legislation are not addressed in the Bylaw, for example, animal welfare in the Animal Welfare Act, pest control in the Biosecurity Act and Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan and dogs in the Dog Management Bylaw.
  • The effect of existing rules in the Bylaw and controls for which changes are not proposed, for example, the restrictions on the ownership of stock in urban areas and conditions for riding horses on certain beaches in Auckland.


What we want your feedback on

We want you to tell us what you think about the proposed changes to the Animal Management Bylaw 2015 and associated controls.

Your input will help us improve how we minimise animal-related risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and misuse of council-controlled public places.


When you can have your say

You can have your say from Tuesday 8 June until Friday 16 July 2021.

Check our key dates for details of events.


What happens next

-All feedback will be considered by a Bylaw Panel at a public meeting scheduled for October 2021.

-The Bylaw Panel will use the feedback to make recommendations on the proposal to the Governing Body at a public meeting scheduled for November 2021.


Every day Aucklanders interact with animals in ways that benefit their mental and physical wellbeing: with their pets at home for companionship, with animals in public to connect with nature, or for recreation such as horse riding.

Sometimes the way people interact with animals causes a problem. A poorly maintained chicken coop may create an odour nuisance, or the feeding of wild animals may attract pests, for example.

The Animal Management Bylaw 2015 enables the council to regulate the keeping of animals to minimise risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and the misuse of council-controlled public places.


How Auckland Council helps maintain human-animal bonds

We make rules about animal ownership and interaction to minimise risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and misuse of council-controlled public places.

We are proposing changes to the Animal Management Bylaw 2015 and associated controls to help improve the rules about animal ownership and interaction and make these rules easier to read and understand.

The main proposals are to:

  • incorporate rules from another bylaw about the feeding of animals on private property
  • update the definitions, structure, format and wording of the Bylaw and controls to make them easier to read and understand.
  • Require approval to keep more than two standard beehives on urban premises with a land area less than 2000 square metres (no approval currently required). Note: Council has heard a range of views about limits on beehives in urban areas and is seeking feedback:
    1. on allowing more or fewer beehives without approval than the proposed two
    2. on limits for different sized urban premises than the proposed 2000 square metres


Other aspects of the Bylaw, controls and their implementation remain unchanged, for example:

  • the Bylaw focuses on the impact of animals on people
  • matters already covered in existing legislation are not addressed in the Bylaw, for example, animal welfare in the Animal Welfare Act, pest control in the Biosecurity Act and Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan and dogs in the Dog Management Bylaw.
  • The effect of existing rules in the Bylaw and controls for which changes are not proposed, for example, the restrictions on the ownership of stock in urban areas and conditions for riding horses on certain beaches in Auckland.


What we want your feedback on

We want you to tell us what you think about the proposed changes to the Animal Management Bylaw 2015 and associated controls.

Your input will help us improve how we minimise animal-related risks to public health and safety, nuisance, offensive behaviour and misuse of council-controlled public places.


When you can have your say

You can have your say from Tuesday 8 June until Friday 16 July 2021.

Check our key dates for details of events.


What happens next

-All feedback will be considered by a Bylaw Panel at a public meeting scheduled for October 2021.

-The Bylaw Panel will use the feedback to make recommendations on the proposal to the Governing Body at a public meeting scheduled for November 2021.